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Sun, Aug

SMALL-SCALE MINING GOES LEGAL WITH COMMUNITY MINING PROGRAMME

Business & Economy

As part of efforts to formalise the activities of small-scale miners in the country, government has introduced the Community Mining Programme (CMP), which will ensure that at least one community mine is set up in each of the mining districts in the country.

As part of efforts to formalise the activities of small-scale miners in the country, government has introduced the Community Mining Programme (CMP), which will ensure that at least one community mine is set up in each of the mining districts in the country.

 

The programme was launched on Wednesday by President Akufo-Addo at Wassa Akropong in the Western Region.

With at least one community mine expected to be set up in each mining district, they will provide employment for more than 4,500 miners trained by the government at the University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa.

Doing it right

Launching the pilot programme at Wassa Akropong, President Akufo-Addo said the CMP will ensure that “mining will be done the right way, within the tenets of the law, and will not destroy our natural resources”.

“Today, we are launching a type of mining that will benefit all of us. I am here to plead with the young men who are participating in the community mining to do their best to adhere to all the laws and do a good job so that money will return to Wassa Amenfi. The money will come,” the President said.

He said the programme will be replicated not only in Wassa Amenfi, but also in other towns by September this year. The programme will be monitored closely to ensure that the standards which have been set for the CMP are adhered to.

Measures

The chairperson of the Interministerial Committee on Illegal Mining (IMCIM), Professor Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng, Minister for the Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation, said the Minerals Commission has blocked out several zones in each of the mining districts for this purpose, with some traditional authorities also providing land for the project.

A number of large-scale mining companies have shed areas to be used for the CMP, the Minister also said, adding that between now and September concessions for the various CMP will be mapped out by the IMCIM mapping team and uploaded on to the bespoke GalamStop software.

Professor Frimpong-Boateng announced that canoes fitted with outboard motors have been procured for the riverine team to monitor water bodies.

“With the rolling out of the CMP, there should be no excuse whatsoever for miners to be mining illegally in the water bodies,” he said.

Anti-galamsey force

In 2017, the government deployed a joint, 400-strong military and police anti-galamsey task force to three regions in Ghana to enforce the ban on illegal small-scale mining.

The troops were subdivided into three and deployed to the Ashanti, Eastern and Western Regions after a robust two-week training course at the Bundase Training Camp. The course equipped task force members with the necessary orientation, guidelines and essential skills for the operation.

The President has pledged his unflinching commitment and support to end the galamsey menace on countless occasions.

The unbridled exploitation of the environment, including pollution of water bodies and degradation of farmland through the activities of illegal miners, pre-empted the setting up of the task force.

The Minerals and Mining Act 2006 (Act 703) and the Amended Act 2015 (Act 900) reserve small-scale mining in this country exclusively for Ghanaians.

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