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Sun, Sep
3 New Articles

MAKE ABURI SAFE NOW (PART TWO)

Health & Lifestyle

Aburi, famed for its lodges, gardens, forests and hills, contributes significantly to green space in Ghana, but over the past decade there has been rapid encroachment on the forest, as the land is sold to build houses.

Aburi, famed for its lodges, gardens, forests and hills, contributes significantly to green space in Ghana, but over the past decade there has been rapid encroachment on the forest, as the land is sold to build houses.

In the late 1980s, Ghana’s forests shrank by 18,000 square kilometres, or nearly two million out of 8.2 million hectares recorded at the turn of the 20th century. The year 2007 brought a reduction of 1.6 million hectares, and every year since then the country has lost huge expanses.

The previous article discussed effects of building on the rockface along the Ayi Mensah portion of the Accra-Aburi road. These include earthquakes, landslides and mudslides.

One may wonder what building on the rockface and deforestation have to do with each other. In a mountainous region, rocks and forests are intertwined. The one cannot function properly without the other. That is why geologists say that although building on the rockface could trigger a catastrophe, an absence of vegetation aggravates the situation. Vegetation holds the soil and rocks in place, and without the root systems of trees, shrubs and other plants, the land is more likely to give way to gravity.