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“ZERO BORLA” FASHION AND MUSIC: AN EVENT TO CAMPAIGN AGAINST SINGLE USE OF PLASTICS IN GHANA

Health & Lifestyle

The world is producing over 300 million tonnes of plastic every year, 50 per cent of which is for single use, meaning it can be used for just a few moments but lasts several hundred years.

The world is producing over 300 million tonnes of plastic every year, 50 per cent of which is for single use, meaning it can be used for just a few moments but lasts several hundred years.

 

Packaging is the largest end-use market section, which accounts for over 40 per cent of total plastic usage. Annually, approximately 500 billion plastic bags are used worldwide with more than a million bags used every minute, yet each bag has an average usage span of 15 minutes.

Plastic bags are not the only problem: 100.7 billion plastic beverage bottles were sold in the United States in 2014, 57 per cent of those being plastic water bottles. Over the years, the numbers have gone up worldwide.

Big impact

Plastic is a valuable resource in many ways, but its poor use leads to plastic pollution. Plastic pollution is very real: though single-use plastics can be small, they have a large impact.

With these statistics and effects ever growing, certain countries have taken initiatives towards reducing the production of plastics, especially single-use plastics, while other countries have banned them outright.

Rwanda became one of the first nations worldwide to ban plastic bags in 2006. The law was fully implemented in 2008. People caught or reported for trying to import plastic bags into the country face penalties such as fines and jail time.

Senegal joined years later. More than five million plastic bags were recorded in litter on the nation’s streets and beaches before its 2015 ban on plastic bags. By 2017, 15 African countries in total had introduced policies to restrict plastic shopping bags, including Tunisia and Cameroon.

Wash Africa, the force behind the Zero Borla Fashion and Music event, is one of many organisations in Ghana campaigning for ban of single-use plastics. It believes Ghana should follow the Rwandan lead, despite the government’s decision to shelve a ban on plastics.