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STATESMAN OPINION: OPERATION CALM LIFE MUST BE SUSTAINED

General News

Last week, the Office of the Vice President enumerated strategies aimed at flushing out armed robbers. In doing that, he also announced major changes in operational structures and personnel at the Ghana Police Service, all aimed at comprehensively and effectively rolling out this major phase of Operation Calm Life.

Last week, the Office of the Vice President enumerated strategies aimed at flushing out armed robbers. In doing that, he also announced major changes in operational structures and personnel at the Ghana Police Service, all aimed at comprehensively and effectively rolling out this major phase of Operation Calm Life.

 

Additionally, the nation was informed by government information machinery about the coming on board of the military, in partnership with the police, to give bite to the national peacekeeping exercise to be undertaken by the total national security apparatus.

Naturally, the decision to involve the soldiers received approval from the general public, because of the more robust and overt nature of the service’s way of enforcing peace in response to the posturing of the armed robbers.

Operation Calm Life, as we all know, was birthed in the heat of a surge in Fulani herdsmen excesses and acts of impunity in food producing areas in the country at a time the new political administration was selling agricultural and youth employment programmes successfully to the nation’s teeming youth constituencies, with encouraging results.

Isn’t it instructive that former President Jerry John Rawlings, who has a wide network of informants, has described the wave as possibly having political links, after hardnosed acts of daylight robberies had been carried out in Tema and Central Accra, in which huge amount of cash was ferried away at the Industrial Area in Accra and the life of a Lebanese businessman snuffed out from a hail of bullets pumped into his body at Tema.

When incidents of such nature are perpetrated in such coordinated manner, there is of course reason to suspect that that strike was ostensibly aimed at disorganizing sustained government business of development. Additionally, judging from the type of weapons and ammunition police are seizing recently, it would be foolish on our part, if we dismissed the Rawlings theory of possible political linkage entirely.

Whatever it is, it is our opinion that the state security apparatus will pick and analyze the right information, in enabling it launch out appropriately at the barbarian community.

Whilst the duration of the mission can only be determined by the political authorities, based on their own findings and judgment, we would still advise that sustaining the programme as a matter of policy is a necessary ingredient in implementing the administration’s transformational ‘One Village, One Dam,’  ‘One District, One Factory’ as well as ‘Planting for Food and Jobs’ programmes.

Rebuilding a nation requires not only visionaries, architects and construction brigades, but also watchmen with swords ready for action, because of the presence everywhere of sadists, the biblical Tobiahs and Sanballats, who love to see others in pain while they use politics as a tool for grab left, cente the nation’s resources for the comfort and convenience of their families, cronies and friends.

To think therefore that all the people out there rejoice in the political change that has rocked this nation is to offer our heads to the executioner gratis.

Already, the decision on the part of the new administration to create an Office and appoint a Special Prosecutor to complement the role of Parliament in protecting the public purse is irritating a section of the political community, who make their living through such acts of political skullduggery.

It is the opinion of the Daily Statesman therefore that we stop such beasts by keeping the fight sustained till the administration leaves office, convinced that it has served its generations the best that any government can offer its citizens.